AUDIO: Advanced Audio Formats

For the home theater environment there are audio formats that add additional audio resolution (more detail) and stream lossless (uncompressed) audio for a better audio experience than typical surround sound formats like Dolby Digital. Some examples of advanced audio formats are Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD, DTS:X, and DTS-HD Master Audio.

Though there are a number of different audio formats, they all have the same goal.  To provide the viewer with the best possible listening experience with their video content.

Dolby Atmos is a surround sound technology created by Dolby.  It is an audio format that improves upon multi-channel soundtracks of video content by creating a "height" layer that produces sound effects above the listener's head to achieve a more 3-dimensional effect. In order to take advantage of Dolby Atmos you will need an AVR that is Dolby Atmos capable and additional speakers to produce sound above you.

Dolby TrueHD is a 7.1 channel audio format that is truely lossless. This means that the audio signal you hear is uncompressed and is 100% identical to the master audio recording.

DTS:X is a surround sound technology that competes against Dolby's Atmos.  DTS:X also requires the use of additional speakers for a "height" layer of sound to create a more 3-dimensional effect.  To be able to play DTS:X based content you will need an AVR that is DTS:X capable.

DTS-HD Master Audio is a high definition audio format that supports 7.1 channel surround sound. It delivers lossless (uncompressed) audio that is 100% identical to the master audio recording.

Control Center passes thru the audio from your sources untouched (it does not decode and recode the signal). There are no audio ports on control center. The audio is included in the video from your HDMI sources and control center passes those through (untouched) with the video on the HDMI output port to your TV, AVR, or soundbar.

Note: Neither Advanced Audio Return (ARC) ports nor optical/TOSLINK ports support these advanced audio formats.

Was this article helpful?
0 out of 0 found this helpful

Related articles

  • Tech Specs

    TECH SPECS Main UnitSize: 263 x 150 x 35 mm Weight: 1.0kg HDMI: 4 inputs, 1 output. HDMI 2.0, HDCP 2.2 IR: 3.5mm IR out Power: Adaptor: 1...

  • Does Control Center Support HDR?

    Yes, Control Center does support HDR. Please note that HDMI 2.0 rated cables are needed in order to display 4K resolutions and HDR color ...

  • HDMI and HDMI Cables - Will Any Cable Work?

    HDMI: HDMI stands for High-Definition Multimedia Interface and it is the format supported by most HDTVs and related devices like DVD and ...

  • What HDMI Versions Does Control Center Support?

    Control Center supports HDMI 2.0 and is also backwards compatible with all older versions of HDMI.  Please note that HDMI 2.0 rated cabl...

  • IR - Infrared Control

    Many devices connected to Control Center can be controlled directly and reliably using IP (internet protocol), BT (Bluetooth) or HDMI-CEC...

  • IP Controls

    IP stands for "Internet Protocol", and IP controls are sent through your home network. IP controls are the default for many dev...

  • HDMI-CEC Controls

    HDMI-CEC is a protocol which allows devices to send functions and commands using a connected HDMI cable. Control Center can use HDMI-CEC ...

  • AUDIO: Advanced Audio Formats

    For the home theater environment there are audio formats that add additional audio resolution (more detail) and stream lossless (uncompre...

  • What is HDR, Dolby Vision, HLG?

      HDR: HDR stands for high dynamic range. HDR allows for deeper blacks and brighter whites this adds more contrast and depth to video con...

  • AUDIO: ARC

    ARC (Audio Return Channel) - ARC is a feature within the HDMI specification from version 1.4 and later. The Audio Return Channel enables ...